President Trump Ends Long Tradition of Celebrating Ramadan in White House!

President Trump just ended a two-decade long White House tradition and skipped the Ramadan celebration this year.

For the first time in at least 20 years, the White House did not celebrate the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of Ramadan on its grounds.

President Donald Trump and the First Lady did issue a statement Saturday marking the end of Ramadan.

“Muslims in the United States joined those around the world during the holy month of Ramadan to focus on acts of faith and charity,” Trump’s statement read. “During this holiday, we are reminded of the importance of mercy, compassion, and goodwill. With Muslims around the world, the United States renews our commitment to honor these values.”

BuzzFeed reported:

The Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of Ramadan, arrived Saturday without a celebration at the White House, ending a presidential tradition going back at least 20 years.

President Donald Trump and the First Lady did issue a statement Saturday marking the end of Ramadan, but did not host an event at the White House to mark the religious holiday.

Instead, the couple attended the wedding of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to Scottish actress Louis Linton, according to White House pool reports.

“Muslims in the United States joined those around the world during the holy month of Ramadan to focus on acts of faith and charity,” Trump’s statement read. “During this holiday, we are reminded of the importance of mercy, compassion, and goodwill. With Muslims around the world, the United States renews our commitment to honor these values.”

The decision not to host an Eid celebration was not a big surprise considering that no invitations had gone out to Muslim leaders in the weeks leading up to the holiday. Still, people across the country still took notice of the administration’s decision.

The tradition of hosting an annual iftar dinner to celebrate Eid al-Fitr at the White House dates back to the Clinton administration, which first hosted the event in 1996. Both the administrations of George W. Bush and Barack Obama continued to host the event, inviting Muslim diplomats and prominent members of the Muslim-American community to the White House for the holiday.

The first White House iftar was held by Thomas Jefferson in 1805 when he invited an ambassador from Tunis to the White House.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson also broke with decades of tradition this year by rejecting a request to host an Eid-al-Fitr reception. The State Department issued its own statement Saturday marking the holiday.

“On behalf of the U.S. Department of State, best wishes to all Muslims celebrating Eid al-Fitr,” the statement read. “This day offers an opportunity to reflect on our shared commitment to building peaceful and prosperous communities.”

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